Worsening diet may predict earlier death in adults with CKD

December 13, 2022

1 minute read

Source/Disclosures

Disclosures:
The authors report no relevant financial information.


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According to a research letter published in American Journal of Kidney Disease.

“Adherence to healthy dietary habits is associated with a reduced risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression and mortality in adults with CKD. However, diet is modifiable and changes in the quality of diet can predict disease progression and survival,” Valerie K. Sullivan, PhD, from the Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology and Clinical Research at Johns Hopkins University, and colleagues wrote. “Using data from the Chronic Kidney Disease (CRIC) Cohort Study, we assessed associations between 4-year changes in diet quality and risk of CKD progression and all-cause mortality in adults with CKD.”

Balanced diet

Although dietary scores did not change significantly over the study period or were not consistently correlated with CKD progression, the researchers identified that a deterioration in diet quality may predict earlier death in adults with CKD. Source: Adobe Stock

Participants underwent diet evaluations at baseline and at year 4.

Researchers scored diet quality according to Healthy Eating Index-2015, Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI)-2010, Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension Diet Score ( DASH) and the alternative Mediterranean diet score. Once scores were determined, scores were categorized as low or high, and changes were categorized as sustained low, sustained high, worsened, or improved.

“When analyzed as absolute score changes over 4 years, in adults without diabetes, increasing DASH scores were associated with a 39% lower risk of CKD progression than stable scores” , wrote Sullivan and his colleagues. “Among adults with diabetes, those with declining AHEI-2010 scores had a 63% higher risk of CKD progression compared to those with stable scores.”

Although dietary scores did not change significantly over the study period or were not consistently correlated with CKD progression, the researchers identified that a deterioration in diet quality may predict earlier death in adults with CKD. Furthermore, variable associations according to diabetes status could be caused by different motivations for the change.

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